Birds of a Feather, part two

In my last blog, I wrote about some ways to capitalize on the fact that word of mouth — recommendations from others one knows — is by far the best way to attract people to performances. Today I will talk about two very effective, direct methods for building your audience, capitalizing on the benefits of word-of-mouth: gift certificates and gift tickets for subscribers. These approaches actually function as word-of-mouth recommendations — but with actual tickets or ticket vouchers attached.

In his book, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, Malcolm Gladwell describes the power of connectors–acquaintances who give us access to opportunities and worlds to which we don’t belong.  People’s reference groups usually have a direct influence on their attitudes or behavior. Reference groups include informal primary groups such as family, friends, neighbors, and coworkers,  and more formal secondary groups, such as religious and professional groups. Often the best connectors are opinion leaders, those people who are respected, whose opinions are valued by others who want to emulate them.

Most people like to attend cultural events with friends or others whose company they enjoy. A study of Cleveland’s cultural patrons undertaken to compare the relative importance of peer group influences and childhood arts education for later arts attendance found that mere exposure of children to culture appears to have little effect on later attendance habits. Rather, adult reference groups are so important that where they are absent, the effects of childhood exposure and education tend to dissipate. Furthermore, since leisure-time activities have a strong social component, group affiliations are highly influential for involvement and attendance patterns.

Gift certificates: A pair of tickets to a particular event, a voucher to be used anytime during the season, a membership (if offered), or a subscription to the organization is a great way for the gift giver to share with his or her recipient(s) an experience the giver highly values and believes that the recipient will also enjoy. Arts marketers can promote gift certificates at holiday time, graduations, and continuously for people who want to gift arts events tickets for special occasions such as birthdays, Mother’s or Father’s Day, anniversaries, weddings or as shower gifts, and so on. Because special occasions occur all year long, the organization should regularly have messages in program book inserts, emails, prominently displayed on the website, and in its social media outlets. (Give the gift of music/theater/dance, a gift that will keep on giving all season long!)

I generally offer discounts to patrons who purchase multiple gift certificates, such as “buy four and get one free,” whether the purchase is for single tickets or subscriptions. The ratio of purchased to free tickets depends on what works best in your organization. Many attenders see this as a one-stop shopping opportunity for holiday gifts for colleagues and for many special occasions. When I attend a bridal shower, I often arrive bearing a cookie jar, filled with the sweetest gift of all: a voucher for tickets to a local theater or a membership at a museum I think the bride and groom would enjoy.

Gift tickets with subscription orders (or for orders of multiple tickets): Performing arts organizations can attract new audience members and offer a benefit to subscribers at the same time. When people subscribe to a series of four or five shows (or more, depending on the organization’s production schedule and goals), the organization can give subscribers a gift of one complimentary ticket to be used by a guest at a performance of their choice, according to availability. A subscribing couple will receive a pair of guest tickets. In this way, the subscribers can host friends for a performance at no cost to them. In turn, the guests are likely to offer to host a dinner before or after the show. This becomes a wonderful, social way for the organization to thank subscribers and to bring in new audience members, many of whom would not have attended without this invitation.

Collect guests’ contact information!: In order to make these programs beneficial for the organization as well as for the patrons, the marketing department must be sure to collect the guests’ contact information before their tickets are distributed so the guests can be added to the mailing list and be followed-up with appropriately.

The most important policy is to keep customers involved. If you involve them, engage them, make your offerings interesting and beneficial for them, they will talk, and they will involve others.

 

 

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